Lung Cancer Research Foundation and Free to Breathe Merger

The Lung Cancer Research Foundation (LCRF) and Free to Breathe (FtB) joined forces to further our impact on lung cancer research discoveries. The organizations merged on September 30, 2017 and will retain the Lung Cancer Research Foundation name to best reflect the combined entity’s shared mission: to improve lung cancer outcomes by funding research for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure of lung cancer. 

Read the official merger announcement press release 

View the Lung Cancer Research Foundation's Video: Together


Frequently Asked Questions About the Merger


1. Why did the Lung Cancer Research Foundation and Free to Breathe merge?

The Lung Cancer Research Foundation and Free to Breathe have merged in order to further our impact on lung cancer research discoveries. By joining forces we can combine resources, accelerate ongoing efforts already established separately, and develop key synergies to make an even greater impact on closing the funding gap for lung cancer research.

2. When did the merger take place?

The required merger documentation was approved by the New York State Attorney General on September 30, 2017. 

3. What is the name under which the merged entity will operate?

The merged organizations will operate under the name of the Lung Cancer Research Foundation. 

4. Will the Lung Cancer Research Foundation and Free to Breathe events conducted in the past still take place?

The merged organization will continue to host public events across the country. Additionally, Free to Breathe’s nationwide series of run/walk and yoga events will continue as the Free to Breathe Event Series.

5. Where is the headquarters of the merged organization located?

The new organization will be headquartered in New York City, with a second office in Madison, WI, and additional staff throughout the country. 

6. What do the Lung Cancer Research Foundation and Free to Breathe do?

Founded in 2005, the Lung Cancer Research Foundation supports lung cancer research. Through its annual Scientific Grant Program, the organization funds innovative, high-reward research that might otherwise go unfunded. The grant program provides critical seed funding to US and international investigators with groundbreaking ideas, helping establish proof of concept evidence to pave the way for additional funding.

Free to Breathe was founded in 2001 and focuses on funding lung cancer research, providing lung cancer education, and promoting advocacy and awareness. The organization creates lung cancer educational materials and makes them available to patients, caregivers and healthcare professionals. By educating patients, they are empowered to make the best and most informed decisions about their treatment and care.

7. How will the merger impact the organizations’ programs?

Both the Lung Cancer Research Foundation and Free to Breathe have a long history of funding innovative, high-reward research across the spectrum of basic, clinical, and translational research that has the potential to extend survival and improve quality of life for people with lung cancer.  The merger will allow us to expand our grant program and increase funding for lung cancer research.

8. What is the mission of the merged organization?

The mission of the new Lung Cancer Research Foundation is to improve lung cancer outcomes by funding research for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure of lung cancer.

9. Where can I go to find out more information?

The current websites for the Lung Cancer Research Foundation and Free to Breathe will remain online until a new, comprehensive website is developed. Until that time, each site will provide a link to redirect visitors to its companion site so all resources from both organizations are easily accessible to visitors. For more information about the merging organizations, please visit www.lungcancerresearchfoundation.org and www.freetobreathe.org.


Contact: 

Emily Prager, Director, Marketing & Communications
212.588.1580; eprager@lungfund.org